October 07, 2016

Bambi-Proof Bulbs

It's fall and a gardener's fancy turns to thoughts of a stunning spring garden radiating color from bulbs. Increasingly many of us have to garden with one eye on that prize and the other on lookout for the next raid from White-tailed deer. If Odocoileus virginianus regularly plunders your garden consider the following spring-flowering bulbs whose flavors are decidedly unpalatable to Bambi.

Allium (Ornamental onion) - Their popularity continues to explode exponentially, as it should. Check out the diversity of flower sizes, colors, bloom times and ease of maintenance that makes one or more of the varieties suitable for almost any imaginable garden situation (except deep shade). Loved by pollinators, Alliums are hated by deer and rabbits for their strong odor and bitter taste when cells are crushed. Don't worry, it won't even get to the taste test.

Camassia (Camass or Quamash) - It's hard to find tall spring-flowering bulbs and Camass does that very nicely, thank you. Grows to 20" and blooms at the end of spring bulb time. Prefers a bit more moisture than most spring bulbs and full sun, but tolerates light shade. Deer and rodents will take a pass.

Galanthus (Snowdrops) - I saw these in a mass planting early this spring and thought, "Why haven't I grown these?" These little charmers bloom right through snow. The downward-hanging, milk-white flowers with green tips remind me of airplane propellers. Subtle, so plant in groups of a dozen or so. They'll naturalize since they're animal-proof. I want to plant the double-flowered Galanthus (flore pleno) this fall. 6" tall, partial sun.

Leucojum (Snowflake) - Late spring blooming, pendulous, bell-shaped white flowers with green dotting on the tips. Long-lasting flowers, elongated, strappy foliage. Part sun/part shade and moist sites. Depending upon species, may get 12-20" tall. Neither deer nor rodent, nary a nibble!

Muscari (Grape hyacinths) - The search for "different" has brought many new forms of this old favorite to our gardens. The standard M. armeniacum is a beautiful cobalt blue naturalizer that doesn't flinch in the face of a deer onslaught. Muscari are different than most bulbs. How so? They produce a few inches of grassy foliage in early fall that remains in place, evergreen, over the winter. Some cunning gardeners use Grape hyacinths to mark areas where larger, major bulbs are- by planting Muscari around the perimeter. This leafy halo helps highlight where the other bulbs are resting during fall and early spring. This can prevent shovel damage if your garden memory gets hazy over the winter. Mine sometimes does, unfortunately....

Scilla (Squill) - The charming blue "haze" in many peoples' spring lawns is almost always from naturalized Scilla siberica. 4-6" tall, grassy foliage blends right into the grass. Reproduces freely by seed and bulbs. Partial shade or full spring sun are fine. Deer and rodents won't stop to dine on this plant.

Daffodils - Deer, rabbits, rodents.No animal is interested in any part, whether it's the bulb, the leaves or the flowers. Totally off limits. Plant daffodils and know that your spring garden will be untouched. 

If none of these suggestions send your horticultural pulse racing (this is by no means a complete listing of all deer-resistant bulbs) and you must have the wonder of tulips I hear you and feel that need, too. So:

  • Check out the small species tulips. They are smaller in stature and flower size, but some do exhibit deer resistance.Otherwise,
  • Be prepared to spray standard tulips with repellents when they emerge, when buds are first visible down in the leaves, and just before buds show color. If you'd like a recommendation, I've had great luck (and beautiful tulips) using Plant-Skydd.

Bulbs, buds, blooms. Just beautiful.  






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